The Gay Marriage Argument Based Upon Disputed Bible Verses

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Those who view gay marriage as a right, often misuse Bible verses for their assertions. The basis for their argument is that certain strange moral behaviors are endorsed by God and the Bible, therefore, no Christian should have any problem with gay marriage.

The following chart illustrates the lack of knowledge that many atheists, critics of the Bible and the LGBT community have, regarding what the Bible teaches:[1]

Gay Marriage Argument Graphic Continue reading “The Gay Marriage Argument Based Upon Disputed Bible Verses”

Are The Levitical Laws of Death For Adultery, Sodomy, And Fornication, Applicable Today?

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There has been some confusion over the Old Testament book of Leviticus, regarding certain provisions in the law of God which calls for death in specific matters of personal conduct. Does the Bible require the death of an individaul who practices adultery, fornication, homosexuality, or lesbianism, today?

In any attempt at understanding the Bible, we should first look at:

  1. Who the particular text is addressed to?
  2. What is the context?
  3. When was it written?

We notice that Leviticus chapter 20 is written specifically to: “the children of Israel.” Therefore, we cannot take this verse and universally apply it to the Christian church today. Nor can we apply it to the world, who are not addressed by this command.

Leviticus 20:1-2  1 Then the LORD spoke to Moses, saying, 2 “Again, you shall say to the children of Israel:

This is not to say that God does not require all people to conduct themselves in purity in matters concerning their bodies. The Bible is very clear that God did not creates us for immorality, but instead to be a people of virtue. Continue reading “Are The Levitical Laws of Death For Adultery, Sodomy, And Fornication, Applicable Today?”

Reconciling the Love of God and the Wrath of God

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Isaiah 53:5b …The chastisement for our peace was upon Him…

Colossians 1:19-20 For it pleased the Father that in Him all the fullness should dwell, and by Him to reconcile all things to Himself, by Him, whether things on earth or things in heaven, having made peace through the blood of His cross.

Isaiah speaks of a chastisement that the Messiah will endure from God in order to make peace possible for us. The Bible is clear that all human beings are in a state of enmity with God in their pre-redemptive state. Because of our sins, we are alienated from God and we cannot have fellowship with Him. In order for fellowship to be possible, all of our sins must be taken away. According to Biblical principle, this can only occur when the penalty for our sins has been satisfied.[1] Isaiah’s prophecy describes the Messiah taking the penalty we deserve and bearing the full wrath of God that was directed at us.

Understanding the wrath of God

One of the most misunderstood attributes of God is His wrath against sin. In the Old Testament, we see graphic illustrations of how this wrath is unleashed on sinners without mercy. To many, God’s anger is offensive and cause enough to flee from His presence. We should give careful consideration to why the Lord is angry against sin. God did not purpose human beings for the suffering we have endured for the past six thousand years. It is because sin came into the world that the good and perfect creation of God has been perverted and corrupted. What should be a wonderful and abundant life for all of us has been ruined by the wrongful actions of people who are doing what is right in their own eyes, without regard to the welfare of others.

Sin has prevented all human beings from experiencing the perfect life that God intended. It has caused unimaginable pain and heartache which has plagued our planet since Adam. When the Lord could endure our misery no longer, He allowed Jesus to come to earth and rescue us. In this amazing display of kindness, God allowed His own Son to take the wrath for our sins, so that we would all be spared from all future wrath.

Continue reading “Reconciling the Love of God and the Wrath of God”